The True Story of “The Da Vinci Code” 1: Hieros Gamos, the 1st Half (Extra-ordinary Lecture Series on Religion) - True Story of Da Vinci Code (Extra-ordinary Lecture Series on Religion) - Lectures


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The True Story of “The Da Vinci Code” 1: Hieros Gamos, the 1st Half (Extra-ordinary Lecture Series on Religion)

Since the publication in 2006, Dan Brown’s The Da Vinci Code has become a world bestseller, selling over 700 millions in 44 languages.

However, when Da Vinci’s paintings are exposed in the novel, his interpretation sometimes shows insufficiencies, and in the second half in particular, some serious misunderstandings. If such is the case, why not search out the ‘true story’ instead of believing the author uncritically like so many people?

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The True Story of “The Da Vinci Code” 1: Hieros Gamos, the 1st Half (Extra-ordinary Lecture Series on Religion)

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Comments by viewers of “The True Story of the Da Vinci Code”

(from a past questionnaire)
  • Quite intriguing! There was such a deep meaning concealed in Da Vinci’s painting! I never thought of that. − A lady in the forties.
  • This was a series of surprises. Marvelous! How  the real truth can be uncovered to such an extent! I had this surprise with every plot of the story. — A gentleman in the fifties.
  • I never heard of an exciting story like this in my life. I am only too grateful... — A gentleman in the thirties.
  • So this is the true Da Vinci Code! The descendents of John... This in-depth knowledge of Master Takeshita surprises me. — A gentleman in the fifties.
  • I felt he was showing the truth without any concealment of the fact. This lecture was entertaining and surprising. Listening to it, I realized too many events remain unknown in the multiple structure of the historical world. — A lady in the thirties.
  • A very intriguing lecture: I read some books and watched a film, but it has taught me what is the true story behind those materials. This was indeed a fascinating experience! — A lady in the thirties.
  • I was surprised to find every story fell into place. This was the first lecture that had made me feel his view on history was authentic. — A lady in the thirties.
  • A very engaging lecture! My eyes were opened to the origins of various religions and their connections, as well as what ancient religions were like. — A lady in the forties.
  • This lecture provides what I was most interested to know. I checked out its trial viewing and decided to be a member. I hope I can enjoy a more detailed lecture on western mysticism, such as gnosticism, some other time. − A gentleman in the thirties.
  • The world revealed by this lecture was completely unknown to me. This was a shocking experience. — A gentleman in the forties.
  • Originally I was interested in world history, so I feel I have become more familiar with the truth of history. This lecture was indeed very interesting and excellent. — A gentleman in the forties.
  • Shy of basic knowledge about religions, I didn’t catch some part of it quite well, yet it was very, very intriguing. − A lady in the forties.
  • A little bit before the Da Vinci Code became popular, I had written a research paper about Leonard Da Vinci. The lecture was all the more interesting for this little experience of mine. It had been rather puzzling to me why that painting was so famous and people said the lady was beautiful. I found the story behind was so enjoyable and terribly deep in implication. — A lady in the forties.
  • This lecture was very entertaining though some part was a bit difficult for me. I understand there is continuation of this story, so I would like to enjoy it at the next chance. — A gentleman in the forties.

Outline & Contents

Since the publication in 2006, Dan Brown’s The Da Vinci Code has become a world bestseller, selling over 700 millions in 44 languages. However, when Da Vinci’s paintings are exposed in the novel, his interpretation sometimes shows insufficiencies, and in the second half in particular, some serious misunderstandings. If such is the case, why not search out the ‘true story’ instead of believing the author uncritically like so many people?

In this light, the point of my talk is to communicate to you what the real truth is on this matter. I will explain the message Leonardo da Vinci actually concealed in some of his paintings, − to be precise, the spiritual, religious meaning of the Holy Grail, the Holy Lance, etc., not the places where they were hidden.
Da Vinci concealed an at least three-fold secret in his works. To make out what this was all about, we have to view some of his paintings within a big-picture perspective and interpret them at and across multiple levels. In the first lecture, we look at the first of the secrets contained in these paintings.

1. Introduction to the Lecture Series on the “Da Vinci Code” (00:00:00)

・This lecture series titled “The True Story of The Da Vinci Code”discusses the true spiritual, religious message da Vince concealed in his works.
・Dan Brown failed to make correct interpretations on this matter, especially in the latter part of his novel. (In this connection, reference is also made to Mona Lisa wo toku [Solving the riddle of Mona Lisa] by Naotake Syuto.)

2. The Secret of The Mona Lisa (00:05:37)

In truth, who was Mona Lisa? First, let’s look at da Vinci’s relationship with the Priory of Sion, a European secret society, and then the message in the Vitruvian Man as well as the secret code hidden in The Mona Lisa as exposed in Dan Brown’s novel. Here, by contrast, reference is also made to Mr. Shuto’s Mona Lisa wo toku (2004).

3. Hieros Gamos or Sacred Marriage (00:17:36)

The concept of hieros gamos, essential to understand da Vinci’s painting, is explained.

4. The Virgin of the Rocks (00:20:33)

The first painted Virgin of the Rocks is very important because we can decode da Vinci’s thought by analyzing this painting. Since Dan Brown’s work has addressed just a part (I would say, one tenth) of this riddle, it is the main purpose of the present lecture to present how to solve it.

5. The Priory of Sion and the Knights Templar (00:27:56)

What was the true reason for founding the Priory of Sion and the Knights Templar? The origin of the legend of Holy Grail is discussed.

6. Syncretism of Christianity and Mythraism (00:35:50)

Under the regime of Constantine the Great, the early Christianity was altered by syncretization with Mithraism. That is to say, the Christianity as we know it today is quite different from the early, or true Christianity. In order to solve the riddle of da Vinci’s paining, we need to know what the early Christianity and Mithraism were each all about.

7. The Key to Solve the Riddle of the Holy Grail in The Last Supper (00:43:25)

There are some enigmatic points about da Vinci’s Last Supper. What is the true identity of the Holy Grail as decoded from the message hidden in this painting? Is there another way of interpretation?

End (00:52:22)

References

  • The Da Vinci Code, Dun Brown.
  • Da Vinci no ango [Secret Codes of da Vinci], Kiyoshi Tanabe, Takarajimasya.
  • Mona Lisa o toku [Solving the Riddle of Mona Lisa], Naotake Syuto, Sangokan.
  • Shukan bijyutsukan Leonardo da Vinci, Shogakukan.
  • The Vitruvius Man by Leonardo da Vinci, in the Academia Museum, Venice.
  • The Virgin of the Rocks by Leonardo da Vinci, in the Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Virgin of the Rocks by Leonardo da Vinci, in the National Gallery, London.
  • The Last Supper by Leonardo da Vinci, in the Santa Maria Delle Gravie, Milan.

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